Environmental Problems: Is Human Growth to Blame?

Random pic to brighten this post. Hope it will be my future home! Picture from here.

Random pic to brighten this post. Hope it will be my future home! Picture from here.

It’s been a while since I last blog! Ever since my birthday weeks ago, things seems to slide down a bit before going upwards again (blame that frozen chicken breast and sudden drop in temperature). I started to do all my routines again, including going to Studium Generale Wageningen UR. Coincidentally, the theme is both “hot” and “current”: is humanity growing too much already that we start poisoning ourselves, just like bacterial growth curve?

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What Research Says about Live Long and Stay Young

Bullseye! Picture from here

Bullseye! Picture from here

I am so happy to go to my current campus! It has a lot of good reading materials. Just yesterday, I picked up last week (19/9) copy of New Scientist (okay, I know it’s stale, but so what?). I find the cover story fascinating. It explains how research starts to uncover the possible treatment to live a long life and preventing aging as well.
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Being Muslim Is…

I am a lousy Muslim. I can’t recite Qur’an properly, and I have finished reading Qur’an from front to back only one time up until now. The only Islamic knowledge I have is what my teacher taught me, both in grade school and afternoon Islamic tutoring. And I find those a bit “disturbing”. That’s why, for a Ramadan project (which extends past its due date), I want to rediscover what being Muslim is like, in an unconventional way.

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Dissecting and Fostering Serendipity

This painting depicts the scene of Three Princes of Serendip. They sure have moustaches! Picture from here.

This painting depicts the scene of Three Princes of Serendip. They sure have moustaches! Picture from here.

“It is clear from the princes’ replies that they have used small clues to infer cleverly the nature of the camel. Grass had been eaten from the side of the road where it was less green, so the princes had inferred that the camel was blind on the other side. Because there were lumps of chewed grass on the road the size of a camel’s tooth, they inferred they had fallen through the gap left by a missing tooth. The tracks showed the prints of only three feet, the fourth being dragged, indicating that the animal was lame. That butter was carried on one side of the camel and honey on the other was evident because ants had been attracted to melted butter on one side of the road and flies to spilled honey on the other.”

This, ladies and gentlemen, is an excerpt of a fairy tale entitled The Three Princes of Serendip. This fairy tale exemplifies chance findings (while I think it tells us more about good detective work by the three princes), and thus coined the word serendipity. Apparently, serendipity played a great role in advancement of science; one session of Studium Generale (SG) Wageningen UR and an article in New Scientist both entertain the idea. And here I am, munching potato chips and drinking juice in the corner of library, trying to summarize the concept of serendipity and find out how to be luckier in science.

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